Still alive, just really busy.

So, it’s been a little bit since I’ve posted and I’m crazy busy. I’m halfway through a blog about the process of being accepted to the Return to Tohoku Initiative put together by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Japanese Tourism Board. I’ll be leaving on September 21st. While you wait with bated breath, please enjoy the following articles and interviews I’ve done recently.

First up, Ottawa Citizen. I’ve learned, these sites don’t archive all of their stuff, so I’ll be reproducing entire articles below for future reference so that there aren’t dead links later on. Click the link if you want to go to the actual article. Continue reading

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Just call me Kanata Man

About a week ago, there was a second article about me in a local paper here in Kanata. Both articles refer to me as “Kanata man” which is a bit strange seeing as I’m from Hamilton, but hey, it’s where I live, so I guess it makes sense.

My short brush with the media while attempting to shed more light on Quakebook in Canada has been an interesting one and the learning curve for dealing with reporters is pretty steep. The first article printed on me in the Ottawa Citizen was less than stellar, if I do say so myself.  Granted, I didn’t give the reporter much to go with and was angry with Western media at that point, so I it only makes sense that my quotes make me sound like a Neanderthal.  Given all of this, I was a bit nervous when I saw a comment on my About page asking me to get in contact with the poster.  I was even more nervous when I first looked at the article and noticed how much quoting there was.  My written thoughts are much better than the incoherent garbage that normally flows freely from my mouth.  As anyone reading this, who knows me personally can attest to.  But I’m relatively pleased with this latest article.  While I think it puts me in a spotlight that is a bit too bright for what my actions.  I’m happy that I didn’t come across like a complete idiot in my second go around with the media.

Through all of this, I have a new found respect for the people in Fukushima that did interviews live, with everything that was going on around them.  I just stood outside, smoked cigarettes and drank coffee while ranting into the phone about Japan and Quakebook.  With print media, they can take your quotes out of context and that’s a scary thing, but at least you know that for the most part, they won’t make you sound like a complete tool.  With all this being said, here’s the second article.  It’s been about a week since it came out, as I’m not the hugest fan of posting things that contain me as the focus, especially the day after they come out.  The last thing I want is for someone to read the article, then follow to my blog and see a post about the article they just read.  Feel free to offer feedback in the comments below.

Kanata man contributes to book on Japanese earthquake

Oh and I really really wish he had actually referred to OurManInAbiko, as OurManInAbiko not “he.”

B

48 hours without posting – Quakebook and News

Sorry for the lull in posts.  Real life is kind of getting in the way, along with working on Quakebook.  I’ve managed to round up contact details for just about every single JETAA (JET Alumni Association) group worldwide and I’m hoping that through JETAA, the word about Quakebook can be spread to local Japanese International Associations and then have it spread from there.  Kind on keeping with the Quakebook motif, spreading the word through contacts and social media.  If anyone is interested in checking out the press release, you can see it here.  The book should be available through Amazon in the next few days.  And even if you don’t have a kindle, you can download software to your PC, Mac, Blackberry, Android, Ipad or Iphone for free from right here.  If you have a blog, feel free to link to the Quakebook page, as I have on the right.  Just grab the image that I have from here and link it.  Continuing with the guerrilla marketing theme, they have created posters for people to put up around their neighbourhoods or at their local library.  You can grab those here.

Ok, enough about Quakebook.  Please don’t see my involvement in Quakebook as abandoning the issues going on in Fukushima.  If you check my Twitter feed (to the right), you’ll see that I’m still retweeting information that I think is relevant.  And if that’s not entertaining enough for you, check out what happens when you get a phone call from the media after 3 hours of sleep.  You say things like:

“It became very confusing, especially with the nuclear thing.”

and

“…you probably don’t know nuclear reactor Japanese.”

In the end, at least it got the word out.  I do have more to say about my short lived experience with the media, but I just don’t have time to throw it all down.  Have a look at the article.  Kanata man contributes to book on Japanese quake.

Alright, back soon with relevant things.